Wednesday, December 23, 2009

2 states — the story of my marriage

-By Swetha Amit
http://domain-b.com/goodlife/Read/20091222_my_marriage.html
Cross-cultural conflicts are no mystery to the inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent. It is a ever-present reality. Chetan Bhagat’s latest book “2 states — the story of my marriage” deals with this issue. Partly autobiographical, the tale of two people belonging to two different states and communities is weaved together with instances from the author’s own life to come up as yet another bestseller.

Chetan Bhagat’s fourth book is the tale of a Punjabi lad Krish and South Indian lass Ananya and how they fall in love and get married. However, things are not simple as that. From being classmates at IIM Ahmedabad, their relationship traverses the stages of friendship, passion and love to the decision to get married, but they have to overcome the ultimate test, staunch opposition to their union from their respective parents. Whether their love proves strong enough to win over their families is what forms a major part of the narrative.

The book is divided into acts pertaining to unique experiences of the protagonist in the cities of Ahmedabad, Delhi, Chennai and Goa. With doses of subtle sarcasm, Bhagat manages to provide an interesting perspective to a common problem faced by youngsters today, familial opposition when marrying out of community and interstate. The reluctance of people of different states to bridge cultural differences between them even as India progresses towards becoming a world power is subtly brought out.

Straight from the heart, the book proves to be realistic in a hilarious way. The author's slightly wicked sense of humour underlying the narrative at various places serves to exhibit real-life situations with authenticity and sincerity — “When people land at Chennai airport, they exchange smiles and proceed gently to the car park. At Delhi, there is a traffic jam of people hugging each other to death.” Also, one cannot ignore the delightful caricaturing of typical Indian stereotypes.

Written in a simple style similar to his earlier works, this book is bound to appeal to the masses as one can easily relate to the storyline and incidents described in the book. Those who enjoyed reading “Five point someone” will like this as well. The book proves to be an easy read — both on the minds and the wallets of the readers.

Labels:

4 Comments:

Blogger A New Beginning said...

Thanks for the review Swetha, will get it soon :) Merry Christmas!!!!!!!

7:13 PM  
Blogger Whirlwind said...

Thanks!! Wishing you the same and have a fabulous 2010!

10:03 PM  
Blogger Amritbir Kaur said...

Thanks for your review..I am in the process of reading the book. Almost halfway and am enjoying reading it.

9:52 AM  
Blogger Whirlwind said...

Thanks for your comment Amritbir. Its a light and humourous read!! Do keep visiting!!

9:20 PM  

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home